Conference Podcasts

Podcasts are audio recordings available on the Internet, which can be easily downloaded to your computer or MP3 player. They can be listened to at your convenience; and you don’t need an iPod to listen, just turn on your computer speakers. Enhanced podcasts include audio recordings synchronized with video of the presenters’ slides. Podcasting is an exciting and relatively new technology, which enables the NODCC to audio tape lectures, discussions, and/or special educational presentations and have them readily available to our worldwide community. Our special appreciation to Scott Sternberg for the gifts of his time and many talents in the development of our DCC Conference Podcasts, and the kind assistance of Dave Shirk, Anthony Fonseca and Bill Webb.

In addition to the NODCC podcasts, we have included a link to a special PBS documentary which features research on agenesis of the corpus callosum. Curious: Mind, Brain, Machine (watch now)

Podcasts from 2016 & 2014 DCC Conferences

Alternative Therapies: Neurofeedback (2014) – Rex Cannon, PhD (watch now)

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapy (2014) – Anh-Tram “Chum” Newcomb, BA (watch now)

Behavioral Intervention Strategies (2016) – Brittany R. Kalicki, MEd, BCBA (watch now)

DCC and Autism Spectrum Behaviors (2014) – Mary Gavin, MEd (watch now)

Education Strategies for Children Ages 5 –12 (2014) – Mary Gavin, MEd (watch now)

Toileting and Incontinency (2016) – Jamie Bassos, MS, BCBA (watch now)

Understanding Social Security (2016) – Sherri Schneider, QDDP (watch now)

NODCC Podcast Library

Note: speaker biographies represent their status at the time of the podcast

ACC Research and Progress (2007) – Elliott Sherr MD, PhD, Lynn K Paul, PhD, & Warren S Brown, PhD (watch now)

Alternative Therapies: Neurofeedback (2014) – Rex Cannon, PhD (watch now)

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapy (2014) – Anh-Tram “Chum” Newcomb, BA (watch now)

Behavior Modification (2006) – Ronald Kotkin PhD (watch now) (watch now 2)

Behavior Modification for Spectrum Behaviors in Children (2009) – Laura Baugh SC (watch now)

Behavior Modification Techniques (2008) – Matthew Mauriello MA (watch now)

Behavior Modification Techniques (2008) – Mary Pipan MD (watch now)

Behavioral Intervention Strategies (2016) – Brittany R. Kalicki, MEd, BCBA (watch now)

Callosal Basics: Neuroanatomy & Cognitive Functions (2008) – Warren S. Brown PhD (watch now)

DCC and Autism Spectrum Behaviors (2014) – Mary Gavin, MEd (watch now)

DCC and Genetics (2008) – Elliott Sherr MD, PhD (watch now)

DCC and Spectrum Disorders: ADD, ADHD & Autism (2008) – Mary Pipan MD & Marie Lewis RN, PhD (watch now)

DCC, Epilepsy and Seizure Management (2008) – Lawrence Brown MD (watch now)

DCC, Epilepsy and Seizure Management (2009) – Lisa Smith MD (watch now)

Developing Self-Esteem and Social Skills for ages 5 – 12 (2008) – Cindy Schneider MEd (watch now)

Developing Social Skills in Children Ages 5-12 (2009) – Noah Minshawi PhD (watch now)

Development of the Corpus Callosum: Agenesis, Partial, Hypoplasia (2006) – John Bodensteiner MD (watch now) (watch now 2)

Developmental Milestones for OT and PT Through the 5th Year (2009) – Carla C. J. Gregory MS, PT (watch now)

Early Developmental Milestones (2007) – Elizabeth McBride OTR & Kate Lundgren OTR, MBA audio_mp3

Early Developmental Milestones: OT, PT & Speech (2008) – Wendy Ross MD (watch now)

Education Strategies for Children Ages 5 –12 (2014) – Mary Gavin, MEd (watch now)

Encouraging Independence: Self-feeding & Toileting (2008) – Keith Williams PhD (watch now)

Financial Planning, Conservatorship, and Guardianship (2009) – Gordon Homes CFP, ChFC, CLU (watch now)

Financial Planning, Trusts and Social Security (2007) – Lindsay McGinley Vitovsky BBA, Richard D. O’Connor Jr. JD & Rosalie Alviar audio_mp3

Helping a Child Socialize for ages 5 – 13 (2007) – Greg L. Gore MA, LPC audio_mp3

Helping Children to Socialize for ages 7 – 12 (2006) – Terrie Naramor PhD (watch now)

High School Educational Strategies for ages 13 – 17 (2008) – Alicia Ramsey MEd (watch now)

Hypoplasia and Partial Corpus Callosum Development (2009) – John Bodensteiner MD (watch now)

Hypoplasia and Partial Development (2008) – Elliott Sherr MD (watch now)

Maximizing Your IEP (2006) – Richard Chamovitz JD (watch now)

Neuropsychological Education Evaluations (2008) – Philip DeFina PhD (watch now)

Neuropsychological Education Evaluations (2008) – James Gillock EdD, ABSNP (watch now)

Nutrition and Healthy Diet (2016) – Florence DiMarco, MPH, RD, CSP, CNSD (watch now)

Parent’s Power in Constructing Your Child’s IEP (2009) – Alicia Ramsey MEd (watch now)

Practical Aspects of Medication Treatment in Person with Intellectual/Developmental Disability (2009) – Craig Erickson MD (watch now)

Pragmatic Language, Body Language and Social Cues (2009) – Debbie Casey-Harvey MS, CCC-SLP (watch now)

Raising a Special Needs Child (2007) – Martha Kate Downey audio_mp3

Sexuality: Teen & Adult Issues (2007)- Martha Kate Downey audio_mp3

Social Security Work Incentives: Ticket to Work (2009) – Becky Deetz and Charo Boyd (watch now)

Special Education and IEPs (2008) – Richard L. Chamovitz JD (watch now)

Speech and Language Issues: Non-Verbal (2009) – Debbie Casey-Harvey MS, CCC-SLP (watch now)

Speech and Language Skills: Inflections, Social Cues, Pragmatics & Body Language (2008) – Amy Betts MSW (watch now)

Speech and Language Skills: Non-verbal & Apraxia (2008) – Amy Betts MSW (watch now)

Teen and Adult: Violence, Extreme Behavior & Delinquency (2008) – Rhonda McKitten Esq (watch now)

Telling Your Child, Siblings and Classmates about DCC (2007) – Kristen Barge MA, LCSW audio_mp3

Telling Your Child, Siblings and Classmates about DCC (2008) – Kim Wesson MEd & Kristen Barge MA, LCSW (watch now) (watch now 2)

Toileting and Incontinency (2016) – Jamie Bassos, MS, BCBA (watch now)

Transitioning to Adulthood (2008) – Marie Lewis RN, PhD (watch now)

Understanding Social Security (2016) – Sherri Schneider, QDDP (watch now)

Back to top

 

Podcast Information

 

Behavioral Intervention Strategies (2016)watch now

Speaker: Brittany R. Kalicki, MEd, BCBA has been working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder since 2005. Brittney graduated with her Bachelor of Psychology degree from Purdue University in 2003. After graduating from college, Brittney moved to Washington State and enrolled at the University of Washington where she graduated with a Master of Education degree in 2007. Upon graduation, Brittney relocated to Colorado, where she worked as a special education teacher. After teaching individuals with autism and running center-based autism classrooms for eight years, she began coursework toward her BCBA certification. Brittney completed her coursework at the University of Colorado-Denver in 2013. She is currently a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Since becoming a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, Brittney has programmed and supervised both home-based and center-based services. She currently runs in-home programming for children ages 2-18 working on increasing skills such as functional communication, compliance, academic, and social skills as well as decreasing challenging behaviors such as vocal stereotypy, self-injurious behavior, and non-compliance. Brittney has worked with individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities for over nine years in public schools, in addition to providing home and center-based behavior analytic services. Her professional interests include toilet training, functional communication training, and teaching social skills.

Lecture Abstract: Appropriate behavior is essential for the success of learning. Despite using effective proactive management strategies, caregivers and teachers may also need to use reactive techniques to reduce challenging behaviors by applying consequences. For these consequences to be effective, they must be aligned with the function, or cause, of the behavior. Otherwise, the consequences may be ineffective in reducing challenging behavior or, in some cases, may actually strengthen the challenging behavior. Researchers in the field of behavior analysis propose four functions of behavior: (1) attention, (2) access, (3) automatic (sensory) stimulation, and (4) escape. Once a caregiver or teacher is able to determine the function of an undesired behavior, he or she will be able to implement consequences addressing that function. This presentation aims to outline the functions of behavior, how to determine each behavior’s function(s), and strategies to manage students’ challenging behavior based on its function.

Back to top

 

Nutrition and Healthy Diet (2016)watch now

Speaker: Florence DiMarco, MPH, RD, CSP, CNSD is a registered dietician and president of DiMarco Nutrition in Action in Naperville, IL. She is currently a Pediatric Nutrition Specialist for the EI program in Illinois. Previously she was employed as a Pediatric Nutrition Specialist for Edward Hospital Neonatal Intensive Unit/Pediatric Intensive Unit/Pediatric Floor, a Pediatric Nutrition Specialist for University of Chicago Children’s Hospital Neonatal Intensive Unit, a Nutrition Specialist for University of Chicago Hospitals Dialysis Center,
and a Clinical Dietitian for Osteopathic Medical Center of Texas. Florence spoke at Illinois Physicians Conference 2004 on weight management and various events in the community 50 regarding infant and children’s feeding as well as special conditions such as, but not limited to, children born with preterm history.

Lecture Abstract: Nutrition can impact children’s development significantly. Starting from birth, research shows breastfeeding/breast milk can provide lots of benefits for an infant’s immunity, feeding tolerance and cognitive development. Healthy diet provides nutrient profile for children’s physiological and cognitive development as well as providing ground for a healthy lifestyle in adulthood. There is confusing information about applying fad diets to meet children’s needs. Lecture will focus on different diet practices for specific nutrition concerns being researched, e.g. casein free diet and/or gluten free diet, FODMAP diet, and ketogenic diet.

Back to top

 

Toileting and Incontinency (2016)watch now

Speaker: Jamie Bassos, MS, BCBA is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst who holds a Master of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis from Northeastern University and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from The George Washington University. She received extensive training in the education and treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders, with an emphasis in early intervention, at the highly respected New England Center for Children, where she conducted research, teacher training and served as a case manager. She has worked extensively as an independent behavioral consultant in North Virginia and as a classroom teacher at the Ivymount School in Rockville, MD. Mrs. Bassos has delivered presentations and training seminars at both local and international conferences. Her professional interests include early intervention and research supporting best practice.

Lecture Abstract: Through this presentation, participants will learn key considerations in the process of identifying individualized assessments and planning of toilet training. Participants will also learn to recognize the most common barriers to successful toilet trainings, as well as adaptive supports that help overcome those barriers. Participants will learn how to identify the risks to training success, trouble shooting strategies, in addition to specific techniques and essentials for parents and teachers.

Back to top

 

Understanding Social Security (2016)watch now

Speaker: Sherri Schneider, QDDP is President of Family Benefit Solutions, Inc. and mother of a child with special needs has been working for thirty years to help individuals with special needs and their families. Her career began as a Social Worker in a CILA group home where she helped those with developmental disabilities and mental illness acquire the government benefits they so desperately needed including SSI, Medicaid and food stamps. She helped launch one of the first CLF facilities funded under a Medicare waiver. As her career flourished, she supervised personnel in Illinois, Missouri and Nevada to assist hospitalized patients apply for the government benefits for which they appeared eligible, including SSDI, SSI, Medicare, community and long-term care Medicaid. She now meets with families to thoroughly assess their situations and pursue appropriate benefit assistance program(s) by guiding them through the application process. Her vast experience has enabled her to establish open, productive relationships with government agencies involved in the decision-making process. She is a member of the executive board of the ARC of IL and is on the faculty of The Illinois Institute of Continuing Legal Education. Families and professionals find her in-service expertise to be invaluable as they attempt to navigate the government benefit arena. 

Lecture Abstract: This informative interactive presentation presents the: who, what, where, when, why and how of the Social Security administration’s two disability programs: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). Both programs provide various work incentives to assist individuals with disabilities to overcome obstacles that prevent them from becoming self-supporting. Deadlines, timelines, redeterminations and ongoing rules will also be discussed. Lecture ends in a game of Benefit BINGO, you will not believe all you have learned.

Back to top

 

Alternative Therapies: Neurofeedback (2014)watch now

Speaker: Rex Cannon, PhD completed his doctorate at the University of Tennessee. He has held the positions of Director of Cognitive Neuroscience at the Cole Neuroscience Center and Director of the Clinical Neuroscience Laboratory both at the University of Tennessee and University of Tennessee graduate school of medicine. He has published numerous research studies using qEEG, LORETA, MRI and fMRI neuroimaging methods. He has fostered a prominent line of research in state dependent neurophysiology and protocols to improve self-regulation across normative and clinical populations. Dr. Cannon holds several positions on journal editorial boards and has authored two books. He currently serves as president for the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR). During his graduate training, Dr. Cannon received science alliance awards and the Cureton Award for psychometrics and neuropsychology. Additionally, Dr. Cannon received the Young Investigator Award from the National Institute of Drug Abuse for his innovative research efforts in developing the Self-Perception and Experiential Schemata Assessment and Treatment (SPESA) model for treating substance use disorders. Dr. Cannon’s SPESA model integrates….Dr. Cannon is spearheading the implementation and ongoing research evaluation of the SPESA treatment model at New Directions, LLC, and Brain Treatment Centers of South Florida.

Lecture Abstract: Neurofeedback (EEG biofeedback, neurotherapy, Neuroregulation) is an operant conditioning technique utilizing a brain-computer interface to target the mechanisms of neural plasticity and neural efficiency to facilitate improvements in self-regulatory processes across clinical and normative populations. Advancements in the technology and delivery of neurofeedback have improved in recent years and include low-resolution tomographic neurofeedback (LNFB), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neurofeedback and other varieties will be discussed. The lecture will cover the neural processes of learning, adaptation and practice. The procedures, empirical support, benefits and limitations of neurofeedback will be discussed as well as important directions for further research and clinical application. Neural networks, functional connectivity and localization theories are important to the global concepts of learning and self-regulation as they pertain to white matter and the structural and functional integrity of neural networks across the neural landscape.

Back to top

 

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapy (2014)watch now

Speaker: Anh-Tram “Chum” Newcomb, BA is the ABA Program Coordinator at Continuum Autism Spectrum Alliance. Ms. Newcomb has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Wheaton College, MA and is currently enrolled in the Masters of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis at Northeastern University, Boston, MA. She previously worked with adults with ASD and other disabilities at the Cove Center, RI, providing relaxation therapy, teaching daily living skills, administering vocational assessments, and providing employment support and training. Ms. Newcomb also served as Senior Teaching Assistant in the Autism Program at The Ivymount School in Rockville, MD. There she worked with children in the 1:1 and small group setting with ages 8 to 17 providing ABA/VB instruction, as well as providing staff training and supervision. She also has extensive experience providing ABA/VB instruction in the residential setting to individuals on the spectrum from ages 3 to 56. Her professional interests include providing effective data-driven treatment plans for behavior intervention and skill acquisition, early intervention, and shaping language through natural environment teaching.

Lecture Abstract: Behavior is always observable and measurable. Applied Behavior Analysis (AB) is the study of human behavior and how to adapt and maintain socially significant behavior in experimental and applied settings. ABA is an evidence-based therapy that relies on years of research and data analysis to inform a treatment plan. This lecture will discuss a brief history of ABA, the basic principles of ABA, misconceptions about ABA and it applications, and provide treatment strategies for the modification and maintenance of the behaviors for all individuals whose profiles require behavioral intervention.

Back to top

 

DCC and Autism Spectrum Behaviors (2014)watch now

Speaker: Mary Gavin, MEd, is a teacher in the Natick Public School District supervises a classroom of eleven students ages 5-9 with severe special needs and sensory impairments. Ms. Gavin coordinates all inclusion time and adapts materials to ensure success for students. She trains teaching assistants and schedules their work day to day. Ms. Gavin plans curriculums, carries out behavior plans and completes all necessary data keeping and assessing needed for all students in the classroom. Ms. Gavin was nominated as Massachusetts Teacher of the Year and named one of top five candidates in Massachusetts.

Lecture Abstract: Children diagnosed with a DCC can exhibit behaviors similar to those exemplified in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attentive deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). As a result they have many challenges in being able to meet academic and social expectations in school. They also often have difficulty functioning successfully within their family and in the community. Lecture will focus on causes of difficult behavior, means of intervention, modification strategies and tools necessary to plan for success in order to help children achieve their potential.

Back to top

 

Education Strategies for Children Ages 5 –12 (2014)watch now

Speaker: Mary Gavin, MEd, is a teacher in the Natick Public School District supervises a classroom of eleven students ages 5-9 with severe special needs and sensory impairments. Ms. Gavin coordinates all inclusion time and adapts materials to ensure success for students. She trains teaching assistants and schedules their work day to day. Ms. Gavin plans curriculums, carries out behavior plans and completes all necessary data keeping and assessing needed for all students in the classroom. Ms. Gavin was nominated as Massachusetts Teacher of the Year and named one of top five candidates in Massachusetts.

Lecture Abstract: Gain a deeper understanding of how to identify the best instructional strategies for your child. Compare and contrast your child’s academic supports as you listen to interviews from paraprofessionals who serve students with special needs. Ideas for the start of the school year will be presented, as well as a brief discussion on teacher training and administrative supports.

Back to top

 

Behavior Modification for Spectrum Behaviors in Children (2009)watch now

Speaker: Laura Van Arendonk Baugh, CPDT KPACTP has been fascinated by behaviorism since her first introduction to the science. As a professional behavior consultant and analyst, she seeks to find the most effective and least aversive solutions to behavior problems.

Lecture Abstract: Children diagnosed with a DCC can exhibit behaviors similar to those exemplified in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attentive deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). As a result they have many challenges in being able to meet academic and social expectations in school. They also often have difficulty functioning successfully within their family and in the community. This lecture will focus on causes of difficult behavior, means of intervention, modification strategies and tools necessary to plan for success in order to help children achieve their potential.

Back to top

 

Hypoplasia and Partial Corpus Callosum Development (2009)watch now

Speaker: John Bodensteiner, MD is the William Pilcher Endowed Chair and Chief of the Pediatric Neurology Division at Barrow. He attended medical school at the University of Iowa, completed his residency in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles, and his neurology training at the University of Iowa. He is currently the President of the Child Neurology Society, and has served in leadership positions in many other capacities during his career in academic pediatric neurology. He has authored or co-authored over 400 scientific publications. Dr. Bodensteiner is Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Neurology at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, and is board certified in Pediatrics and Neurology with Special Qualification in Child Neurology. His clinical interests include neuromuscular diseases and genetic syndromes affecting children.

Lecture Abstract: Agenesis/partial/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum has been described in over 200 genetic disorders and is associated with other intracranial malformations. The embryology and development of the brain and some of the key structures including the midline brain formation will be presented. The etiologies of agenesis, hypoplasia and partial absence of the corpus will be discussed as well as the significance of the differences in the outcomes with the various conditions.

Back to top

 

DCC and Epilepsy (2009)watch now

Speaker: Lisa H Smith, MD is Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, IN. Lisa instructs on the basic principles behind the classification of seizures and epilepsy syndromes, and how a physician directs a patient’s treatment program to achieve optimal seizure control while emphasizing quality of life.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture presents the basic principles behind the classification of seizures and epilepsy syndromes and how a physician directs a patient’s treatment program to achieve optimal seizure control while emphasizing quality of life. Presentation touches on medical, surgical, and alternative methods for seizure control including common anticonvulsants, medications, special dietary approaches (ketogenic diet), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and biofeedback. Emergency management of seizures will be explained including the A, B, C’s (airway, breathing, and circulation) and acute treatment with benzodiazepines.

Back to top

 

DCC & Developing Social Skills in Children ages 5-12 (2009)watch now

Speaker: Noha Minshawi, PhD joined the faculty of Indiana University School of Medicine in 2007. She earned her doctorate in clinical psychology from Louisiana State University where she specialized in developmental disabilities. Dr. Minshawi practices at the Christian Sarkine Autism Treatment Center at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, Indiana. Her clinical focus is on Applied Behavior Analysis and behavioral interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders. She provides parent training in individually-designed behavioral interventions to address a number of different behaviors, such as social skills deficits and maladaptive behaviors.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture emphasizes the role of the parent as it relates to a child’s social development. The relationship requires a secure base, knowledge of your child’s unique set of personal strength and weaknesses, and consistency in routine and limit setting. Practical techniques will be discussed to help the school aged child to comfortably and competently socialize with others. Participants will be given the opportunity to share behaviors of concern specific to a DCC diagnosis. Socialization information relative to other diagnoses, disorders, and delays will be correlated to the DCC diagnosis. In addition, children and their chemistry of emotions: will be discussed as it relates to mood concerns, which influence peer connection and social interaction.

Back to top

 

Developmental Milestones for OT and PT Through the 5th Year (2009)watch now

Speaker: Carla J Gregory, MS PT speaks about the developmental milestones through the 5th year. Using a series of skill development benchmarks that typically developing children achieve in relatively the same order in relatively similar time frames and how to guide your child’s progress.

Lecture Abstract: Rolling over, sitting up, walking and talking are typical milestones in a baby’s first year. However, children diagnosed with a DCC may be delayed in one or more of these crucial stages. In this lecture, significant developmental steps in a child’s growth from birth through early childhood will be discussed including sensory integration dysfunction, gross motor skills (using large groups of muscles to sit, stand, walk, run, keeping balance, and changing positions) and fine motor skills (using hands to be able to eat, draw, dress, play, write, and do many other things. How to recognize developmental delays at specific ages and recommendations for therapeutic intervention will be discussed with emphasis on early intervention.

Back to top

 

Financial Planning, Conservatorship, and Guardianship (2009)watch now

Speaker: Gordon Homes Jr., CFP, ChFC, CLU specializes in Financial and Estate Planning for families who have children or dependents with special needs. He brings a unique perspective through his experience both as an advisor and parent. He assists families with a myriad of issues including understanding and accessing public benefits, preserving benefit eligibility through Special Needs Trusts, and guardianship concerns.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture covers financial planning, trusts, legal and financial issues in special needs planning including writing a letter of intent, filing for guardianship of a child or adult, client self-determination issues, and determination of funds needed to provide lifetime quality care.

Back to top

 

Social Security Work Incentives: Ticket to Work (2009)watch now

Speakers: Becky Deetz has been employed by the Social Security Administration for 19 years. For the last 5 years, Becky has been the Area Work Incentives Coordinator (AWIC) for the state of Indiana. Becky’s responsibilities include working with the public to ensure the understanding of SSA employment support programs. She works closely with the Indiana Social Service Agencies by provides training for their staff members on all of SSA Work Incentives, including the Ticket to Work program.

Charo N. Boyd, is the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) Public Affairs Specialist for Southern Indiana. Boyd is responsible for informing the public about SSA programs and benefits. She is often the guest speaker for retirement and disability seminars. She has also trained HR managers, financial planners, tax preparers, social workers, case managers, disability advocates, and attorneys on various topics. Boyd has been employed with SSA since 2002. She began her career as a claims representative in the Downtown Indianapolis District SSA office. She has worked as an Insurance Specialist in all areas of the Title II Program (Medicare, Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Benefits). Boyd has a B.S. in Psychology (Magna Cum Laude) and a M.S. in Guidance & Counseling with a concentration in clinical and organizational counseling all from Tennessee State University.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture presents an overview o the Social Security Administration’s two disability programs: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) with primary focus on the SSI program. Both programs provide various work incentives to assist disabled individuals overcome obstacles that prevent them from becoming self-supportive. Topics discussed include government benefits available, techniques to preserve government benefits, eligibility for SSI and Medicaid with recommendations on how to first approach the SSA, what documentation or data is required to initiate the process, what you should expect to hear, and typical approval timelines.

Back to top

 

Speech and Language Issues: Non-Verbal (2009)watch now

Speaker: Debbie Casey-Harvey, MS, CCC-SLP

Lecture Abstract: Children diagnosed with a DCC may experience significant delays in speech and language. Some do eventually catch up with their peers in certain areas of language; others remain at a delayed level or they may never develop spoken language. This lecture presents an overview of typical speech development, how to recognize a child’s delay including an apraxia diagnosis, explores early age assistive therapies, and the role of the speech and language therapist. Emphasis is on the importance of recognizing a large number of children who are non-verbal or who have delayed speech and language skills that have better receptive language skills than expressive skills (i.e. they understand much more than they are able to express verbally).

Back to top

 

Pragmatic Language, Body Language, and Social Cues (2009)watch now

Speaker: Debbie Casey-Harvey, MS, CCC-SLP

Lecture Abstract: Individuals diagnosed with a DCC who have normal verbal skills often have difficulties with decoding, prosody, fluency and word retrieval as well as pragmatic language including taking conversational turns, staying on topic, initiating and ending a conversation, not interrupting, making eye contact, sensing when a conversation has gone far enough, understanding humor and non-literal language. These skills often present a huge challenge for these individuals and can hinder their social acceptance. This lecture will explain these various language issues and provide recommendations and techniques to help children, teens and adults with a DCC improve their communication skills.

Back to top

 

Parent’s Power in Constructing Your Child’s IEP (2009)watch now

Speaker: Alicia Ramsey, MEd attended the University of Akron, where she received her Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education, and she received her Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership from Indiana University. Alicia has 14 years educational experience starting as a middle school teacher, a Dean of Students, an Assistant Principal, and a Principal. In 2002 she was the first African-American female to be elected to the school board in Pike Township for a four-year term. In January of 2008 Alicia left her job as Principal of Perry Meridian 6th Grade Academy to take on the challenge of “restructuring” a school that has failed to make annual yearly progress under the No Child Left Behind legislation. She recently resigned from her principalship in order to work with her husband as the Executive Director of Staff Relations at New Life Worship Center. Alicia is married to Rev. John Ramsey Sr. and they have two children, John Ramsey Jr. (11) and Jeremiah David (8). Jeremiah was diagnosed with partial ACC during Alicia’s 25th week of pregnancy. At the age of three his diagnoses were seizure disorder (grand mal), apraxia, hypotonia, and developmental delays. After attending their first NODCC conference in 2007 the Ramsey family went in search of more information regarding their son’s prognosis. As a result of their investigation, he was then diagnosed with complete ACC and colpocephaly.

Lecture Abstract: Attending your child’s first Individualized Education Plan (IEP) conference at a public school can be intimidating and confusing. Many parents go into these school meetings unprepared and unaware of their child’s legal rights. This lecture provides the tools necessary to prepare for an IEP conference using wisdom, experience, and knowledge and to empower parents to control their child’s educational journey. Information will be shared from three different perspectives: parent, school administrator, and advocate including answers to question such as:

  • How a meeting and/or testing can be acquired for your child?
  • How to use Article 7 for your advantage?
  • Who needs to be present for your case conference and how long must they be present?
  • What is an IEP, how should it be written, and who determines what is written?
  • How to cultivate a productive relationship with your child’s teacher?
  • How can I ensure that my child is receiving the most out of the education available to them?
  • Homeschooling vs. Public Schooling vs. Private Schooling

Back to top

 

Behavior Practical Aspects of Medication Treatment in Persons with Intellectual/Developmental Disability (2009)watch now

Speaker: Craig A. Erickson, MD is employed by the Riley Hospital Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic Craig received his B.A. in Chemistry from DePauw University, Greencastle, IN and in 2003 graduated with his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH. In 2007 he completed his Psychiatry Residency at Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN. In 2007 he was promoted to Chief Resident in Psychiatry at Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN.

Lecture Abstract: The medical and psychological symptoms in a disorder of the corpus callosum can become quite complicated. Individuals diagnosed with a DCC are at high risk for epilepsy and often have behavioral issues (rages, depression, disordered thinking, etc.). This lecture will provide information on the key classes of medications which are relevant to treating behavioral issues in DCC and will examine cautionary considerations for using psychotropic medications with brain-injured individuals.

Back to top

 

Behavior Modification Techniques (2008)watch now

Speaker: Mary Pipan, MD graduated from the University School of Medicine in 1987. She then did a general pediatrics residency at the University of Minnesota.She practiced general pediatrics in rural West Virginia for 5 years before coming to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to train in Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics. She has been an attending physician at CHOP since 1999, and has specialized in the developmental and behavioral aspects of genetic disorders.

Lecture Abstract: Behavior in children with corpus callosum disorders can be challenging and requires more careful exploration and thoughtful management than in typical children. Causes of difficult behavior are discussed as well as ways to intervene.

Back to top

 

Behavior Modification Techniques (2008)watch now

Speaker: Matthew Mauriello, MA graduated from Penn State University in 2004 with a BS in Psychology and from West Chester University in 2006 with a MA in Clinical Psychology. He currently is a Behavior Specialist Consultant for The Institute for Behavior Change. Matthew has presented and published on a diverse array of topics, including coping with stress and styles of humor, cross-cultural retirement, and the relationship of binge eating and binge drinking in college students. In addition, he teaches courses in psychology part-time at Wilmington University in Delaware.

Lecture Abstract: Behavior in children with corpus callosum disorders can be challenging and requires more careful exploration and thoughtful management than in typical children. Causes of difficult behavior are discussed as well as ways to intervene.

Back to top

 

Callosal Basics: Neuroanatomy & Cognitive Functions (2008)watch now

Speaker: Warren S. Brown, PhD is Professor of Psychology at the Graduate School of Psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary, where he is Director of the Lee Travis Research Institute. He received his PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Southern California. He is actively involved in neuropsychological research, particularly related to the consequences of agenesis of the corpus callosum for intellectual and social abilities. Among his more than 75 research publications are 15 articles on the neuropsychology of ACC. Dr. Brown also co-authored 37 presentations at scientific meetings regarding his research on ACC.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture presents an overview on abnormalities of the corpus callosum including discussion on diagnosis, variability, intelligence, mental abilities, behavior, cognitive thinking and social disability.

Back to top

 

DCC and Genetics (2008)watch now

Speaker: Elliott Sherr, MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Neurology and Pediatrics at UCSF. He directs the Brain Development Research Program, a group that studies the genetics and biology epilepsy, autism and disorders of cognition. This research program is supported by grants from the NIH, the March of Dimes and private donors. Dr. Sherr is a board certified Child Neurologist and is the co-director of the Neurometabolic program and clinic at UCSF. Dr. Sherr is a native of California and completed his undergraduate degree in Philosophy and Biology at Stanford University. He obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. at Columbia University in New York City and completed his clinical training in Pediatrics and Neurology at UCSF. He lives in San Francisco with his wife (a biotechnology financial executive) and his three children.

Lecture Abstract: Agenesis/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum has been described in over 200 genetic disorders and is associated with other intracranial malformations and non-CNS malformations. The varied etiology and patterns of these syndromes are discussed, including recurrence risk in subsequent pregnancies.

Back to top

 

DCC, Epilepsy and Seizure Management (2008)watch now

Speaker: Lawrence Brown, MD is a senior pediatric epileptologist in the Pediatric Regional Epilepsy Program and director of the Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Program at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He has a special interest in the behavioral disorders and sleep in children with neurological disorders. Dr. Brown is the president-elect of the Child Neurology Foundation and past chairman of the executive committee of the Neurology Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Lecture Abstract: Presentation of the basic principles behind classification of seizures and epilepsy syndromes; options including medication, special dietary approaches and surgery; how a physician directs a patient’ treatment program to achieve optimal seizure control while emphasizing quality of life.

Back to top

 

DCC and Spectrum Behaviors: ADD, ADHD, & Autism (2008)watch now

Speakers: Marie Lewis, RN, PhD is the Director of the National Center for Autism Resources and Education, a Neuro-Developmental Disability Case Manager and an expert in transitional planning services. She provides educational and behavioral consulting services to parents, clinical specialists and lawyers in preparation for IEP meetings, inter-agency meetings, and Due Process hearings. Dr. Lewis trains educational advocates and consultants and lectures nationally for disability groups, school districts, parent support groups and continuing medical education programs. She has testified before the US Department of Education and has served as a consultant to special educational law programs in multiple states. She is on the advisory board and boards of national and regional disability related organizations.

Mary Pipan, MD graduated from the University School of Medicine in 1987. She then did a general pediatrics residency at the University of Minnesota. She practiced general pediatrics in rural West Virginia for 5 years before coming to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia to train in Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics. She has been an attending physician at CHOP since 1999, and has specialized in the developmental and behavioral aspects of genetic disorders.

Lecture Abstract: Children with disorders of the corpus callosum can exhibit behaviors of autism spectrum disorders, as well as attention deficit disorders. As a result they have many challenges medically and educationally in being able to meet academic and social expectations, and may have difficulty functioning successfully socially and academically. Lecture covers basics about both autistic spectrum disorders and ADD as well as strategies that address these issues in order to help children with corpus callosum disorders achieve their potential.

Back to top

 

Developing Self-Esteem and Social Skills for ages 5 – 12 (2008)watch now

Speakers: Cindy Schneider, MEd has been a special educator and consultant for 27 years and a childrens theater director at a local community theater for 20 years. Ms. Schneider combines her two passions – theater and autism – to develop drama and music workshops designed to teach social cognition to individuals with AS and HFA. Her book, Acting Antics, was published in 2007 by Jessica Kingsley Publishing, with a foreword written by Dr. Tony Attwood. Now retired from public education, Ms. Schneider operates the Acting Antics Arts Center outside of Downingtown Pennsylvania, where children, teens and adults participate in drama and music workshops designed to teach social cognition skills, and to develop a viable interest in a sustainable leisure time activity.

Susan March, OT is an Occupational Therapist with more than 30 years experience. She currently works as an educational consultant through Chester County Intermediate Unit, training and supporting teachers who serve students with special needs in the 12 county school districts. Additionally Ms. March has worked with Cindy Schneider in the Acting Antics program for the past four years.

Lecture Abstract: This presentation is an interactive session in which parents and professionals learn the theory and practice behind using music and theater techniques with students diagnosed with DCC to improve their social cognition and self-esteem while developing a viable leisure time activity. Participants will be introduced to theater and music activities while learning how each activity addresses skill deficits in the comprehension of non-verbal cues, understanding abstract language, working in a cooperative group, turn-taking and more.

Back to top

 

Early Developmental Milestones: OT, PT & Speech (2008)watch now

Speaker: Wendy Ross, MD is the Director of Developmental Medicine and Genetics at Albert Einstein Medicine Center. Medical School: Mt Sinai School of Medicine, University of New York, NY Fellowship: Boston Children’s Hospital. Areas of interest include Autism, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity, Sleep Disorders and Learning Disabilities. Her co-presenter, Christopher Colameco, is a volunteer in her department.

Lecture Abstract: Developmental milestones in a child’ growth from birth through early childhood are discussed including gross and fine motor skills and sensory integration dysfunction. Recognition of developmental delays at specific ages and recommendations for therapeutic intervention are also discussed.

Back to top

 

Encouraging Independence: Self-feeding & Toileting (2008)watch now

Speaker: Keith Williams ,PhD is the Director of the Feeding Program at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center. He is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and the Penn State College of Medicine. Keith’s clinical practice involves the treatment of children with a range of feeding problems. He also conducts research involving feeding problems and childhood nutrition. Before starting the Feeding Program at Hershey, Keith worked at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in the Department of Behavioral Psychology. Keith has a Bachelor’ degree in Psychology and a Linguistics degree from the University of Massachusetts. He earned a doctoral degree from the University of Maryland Baltimore County. Keith is a licensed psychologist in Pennsylvania and Maryland as well as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture includes the “how-to’” of teaching children to self-feed and toilet independently. Several interventions are presented for each topic and how to determine which method is the best suited for a particular child are discussed.

Back to top

 

High School Educational Strategies for ages 13 – 17 (2008)watch now

Speaker: Alicia Ramsey, MEd received her Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education at the University of Akron, and her Master’ Degree in Educational Leadership from Indiana University. She has 13 years of educational experience starting as a middle school teacher, a Dean of Students, an Assistant Principal, and a Principal. In 2002, Mrs. Ramsey was the first African-American female to be elected to the school board in Pike Township for a four-year term. In January of 2008 Mrs. Ramsey left her job as Principal of Perry Meridian 6th Grade Academy to take on the challenge of “restructuring” a school that has failed to make annual yearly progress under the No Child Left Behind legislation. She is married to Rev. John Ramsey Sr.; they have two children and their youngest son is diagnosed with complete ACC and colpocephaly.

Lecture Abstract: not available

Back to top

 

Hypoplasia and Partial Callosal Development (2008)watch now

Speaker: Elliott Sherr, MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Neurology and Pediatrics at UCSF. He directs the Brain Development Research Program, a group that studies the genetics and biology epilepsy, autism and disorders of cognition. This research program is supported by grants from the NIH, the March of Dimes and private donors. Dr. Sherr is a board certified Child Neurologist and is the co-director of the Neurometabolic program and clinic at UCSF. Dr. Sherr is a native of California and completed his undergraduate degree in Philosophy and Biology at Stanford University. He obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. at Columbia University in New York City and completed his clinical training in Pediatrics and Neurology at UCSF. He lives in San Francisco with his wife (a biotechnology financial executive) and three children.

Lecture Abstract: In this lecture the embryology and development of the brain and some of the key structures including the midline brain formation are presented. The etiologies of agenesis, hypoplasia and partial absence of the corpus callosum are discussed as well as the significance of the differences in the outcomes with the various conditions.

Back to top

 

Neuropsychological Education Evaluations (2008)watch now

Speakers: Philip DeFina, PhD is Director of Neuropsychology at the Neurometric Evaluation Service of the New York University Brain Research Laboratories. He is a Faculty Member in the Department of Psychiatry at the N.Y.U. School of Medicine; was instrumental in developing the American Board of Pediatric Neuropsychology; and is currently President of the American Board of School Neuropsychology. He has trained over 600 psychologists and 200 diplomats in neuropsychology nationwide. Dr. DeFina is currently the Chief Scientific and Chief Executive Officer of the International Brain Research Foundation. He is Program Director for the Neuropsychiatric Advanced Care Unit for coma and traumatic brain injury at Bellevue Hospital Center. Dr. DeFina has given over five hundred lectures, seminars and workshops on numerous neuropsychological topics worldwide, and has authored numerous professional articles, chapters and books in cognitive and behavioral neuroscience.

Lecture Abstract: The components of a school neuropsychological evaluation.

Back to top

 

Neuropsychological Education Evaluations: Neuropsychology of Corpus Callosum Disorders (2008)watch now

Speakers: James Gillock, EdD, ABSNP a licensed psychologist, has worked 29 years as a psychologist and director of special services for New Jersey schools, as well as a private practitioner in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Board-certified in school neuropsychology, he received his Ed. D. in school psychology from Temple University in Philadelphia and his post-doctoral training in rational-emotive psychotherapy at the RET Institute in New York City. New in private practice in Doylestown, PA, he has developed the Gillock-DeFina Neuro-educational Mental Status Evaluation.

Lecture Abstract: The neuropsychology of corpus callosum disorders.

Back to top

 

Special Education and IEPs (2008)watch now

Speaker: Richard L. Chamovitz, JD represents families who dispute the education provided to their children with special needs.He is a former federal prosecutor who now represents teenagers with special needs who have been referred to the criminal justice system. In October 2007, Governor Rendell appointed Mr. Chamovitz to the Governor’ Advisory Committee for People with Disabilities. He is the Past President of The Arc of Chester County, which offers services and programs to meet the needs of all individuals with disabilities and their families, and chairs its Government Affairs and Advocacy Committee. He co-chairs the Advocacy and Government Affairs Committee of the Arc of Pennsylvania and is a member of the Human Rights and Advocacy Committee for The Arc of The United States. He has testified before Pennsylvania legislators on issues that affect individuals with disabilities and their families. He presents locally and nationally on special education issues to parents, teachers, physicians, advocates and attorneys.

Alicia Ramsey, MEd received her Bachelor of Arts in Secondary Education at the University of Akron, and her Master’ Degree in Educational Leadership from Indiana University. She has 13 years of educational experience starting as a middle school teacher, a Dean of Students, an Assistant Principal, and a Principal. In 2002, Mrs. Ramsey was the first African-American female to be elected to the school board in Pike Township for a four-year term. In January of 2008 Mrs. Ramsey left her job as Principal of Perry Meridian 6th Grade Academy to take on the challenge of “restructuring” a school that has failed to make annual yearly progress under the No Child Left Behind legislation. She is married to Rev. John Ramsey Sr.; they have two children and their youngest son is diagnosed with complete ACC and colpocephaly.

Lecture Abstract: Alicia Ramsey and Richard Chamovitz combine their experience as parents of children with a disorder of the corpus callosum, as a school principal and as a special education attorney to discuss what you need to know about special education and the development and implementation of IEPs.

Back to top

 

Speech and Language Skills: Inflections, Social Cues, Pragmatics & Body Language (2008)watch now

Speaker: Amy Betts, MSW has been a Speech and Language Pathologist for over 23 years in a variety of school settings. Specializing in augmentative communications, language disorders, pragmatic language and literacy, she has worked with children and young adults with autism, developmental delays, and low incidence disorders. In addition, Amy has a young family member diagnosed with a disorder of the corpus callosum.

Lecture Abstract: Children with a DCC and normal verbal skills often have difficulties with decoding, prosody, fluency and word retrieval as well as pragmatic language including taking conversational turns, staying on topic, initiating and ending a conversation, not interrupting, making eye contact, sensing when a conversation has gone far enough, and understanding humor and non-literal language. These skills often present a huge challenge for children with a DCC and can hinder a child’s social acceptance. This lecture explains these various language issues and provides recommendations and techniques to help children improve their communication skills.

Back to top

 

Speech and Language Skills: Non-verbal & Apraxia (2008)watch now

Speaker: Amy Betts, MSW has been a Speech and Language Pathologist for over 23 years in a variety of school settings. Specializing in augmentative communications, language disorders, pragmatic language and literacy, she has worked with children and young adults with autism, developmental delays, and low incidence disorders. In addition, Amy has a young family member diagnosed with a disorder of the corpus callosum.

Lecture Abstract: Apraxia of speech is a disorder of the motor planning and execution of speech. Children who exhibit apraxia typically have significantly greater comprehension of speech than they are able to produce themselves. Speech production may be very difficult to understand, characterized by struggle (they want to say it but cannot get it out), or absent altogether. This presentation discusses the symptoms, causes, and treatments of apraxia, and explores options for Alternative and Augmentative Communication methods for non-verbal children.

Back to top

 

Teen and Adult: Violence, Extreme Behavior & Delinquency (2008)watch now

Speaker: Rhonda McKitten, Esq is a senior trial attorney At the Defender Association of Philadelphia, juvenile unit and the DMC Coordinator for the county of Philadelphia. Ms. McKitten served as the Director of the Defender Association’s Special Education Program, representing children with disabilities in school based and juvenile delinquency proceedings from 2005 – 2007. A 1999 graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Ms. McKitten clerked for the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and has taught Juvenile Justice as an adjunct professor at the Temple University Beasley School of Law.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture will include a discussion of critical issues that arise when people with a disorder of the corpus callosum engage in inappropriate and/or violent behavior. A psychologist and public defender addresses sensitive issues relative to how an individual with special needs may encounter the legal system.

Back to top

 

Telling Your Child, Siblings and Classmates about DCC (2008)watch now
watch now 2

Speakers: Kim Wesson holds a MEd in Learning and Language Disabilities and BA in Elementary Education and Special Education. She has been teaching in Maine and New Hampshire for 19 years and has taught Educational Assessment and Writing IEP in the Education Department at Notre Dame College in Manchester, NH. Ms. Wesson has experience working with a diverse population of special children at the elementary and middle school level. She is currently working in a public middle school, and has four years of experience teaching a child with P-ACC. She has helped to establish successful inclusion programs in public schools, and has volunteered to help and support families as they advocate for their children and navigate the special education system.

Kristen Barge MA, LCSW attained a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology with a minor in Family Services from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a MA in Counseling Psychology from National University in San Diego, CA. She lives with her family in Madison, WI where she works part-time with the Dane County Department of Human Services specializing in work with delinquent teens and their families in Juvenile Court. Kristen and her Wisconsin planning team hosted the 2004 ACC conference in Madison, WI. A member of the NODCC Board of Directors, she has attended conferences since 2001 and has recently started to help facilitate networking sessions at the conferences by sharing her experiences as a professional and a parent of an ACC child.

Lecture Abstract: Kristen Barge, parent of a child with complete ACC, and Kim Wesson, teacher of a student with partial ACC, share their experiences of when and how to tell your child about DCC as well as give a demonstration of materials they use to explain the condition. Since parents of children with special needs are the experts of their own child and because we all learn from each other, parents attending this session will be encouraged to share any techniques they use that are particularly helpful to them. The pros and cons of “telling” will be discussed with a primary emphasis on telling your child they have DCC.

Back to top

 

Transitioning to Adulthood (2008)watch now

Speaker: Marie Lewis, RN, PhD is the Director of the National Center for Autism Resources and Education, a Neuro-Developmental Disability Case Manager and an expert in transitional planning services. She provides educational and behavioral consulting services to parents, clinical specialists and lawyers in preparation for IEP meetings, inter-agency meetings, and Due Process hearings. Dr. Lewis trains educational advocates and consultants and lectures nationally for disability groups, school districts, parent support groups and continuing medical education programs. She has testified before the US Department of Education and has served as a consultant to special educational law programs in multiple states. She is on an advisory board, as well as boards of national and regional disability related organizations.

Lecture Abstract: Children with a disorder of the corpus callosum have unique transitional planning needs. This transition into adulthood is a “whole family” experience. Presentation includes steps and resources to help the person with a disability move through this major stage of life. Topics such as vocational exploration, employment options, independent living/housing, attendant care services, self advocacy, financial planning, social services, medical services, leisure and recreation resources, family support, advocacy services and transportation are addressed.

Back to top

 

Curious: Mind, Brain, Machine (PBS, 2007) – watch the episode now

CURIOUS, a PBS documentary on selected California Institute of Technology scientists, was produced by WNET in New York with funding from TIAA-CREF and has been aired by PBS stations throughout the U.S. over the last few months. The episode Mind, Brain, Machine features a segment in which Dr. Lynn K. Paul discusses agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC).

Lynn K. Paul, PhD is the head of the Corpus Callosum Research Program at Caltech. This program represents the hub of the AgCC Research Consortium, a multisite collaborative effort whose other members include the Fuller Graduate School of Psychology/Travis Research Institute and the University of California in San Francisco.

Back to top

 

ACC Research and Progress (2007)watch now

Speakers: Elliott Sherr ,MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Neurology and Pediatrics at UCSF. He directs the Brain Development Research Program, a group that studies the genetics and biology of epilepsy, autism and disorders of cognition. This research program is supported by grants from the NIH, the March of Dimes and private donors. Dr. Sherr is a board certified Child Neurologist and is the co-director of the Neurometabolic program and clinic at UCSF. Dr. Sherr is a native of California and completed his undergraduate degree in Philosophy and Biology at Stanford University. He obtained his M.D. and Ph.D. at Columbia University in New York City and completed his clinical training in Pediatrics and Neurology at UCSF. He lives in San Francisco with his wife (a biotechnology financial executive) and his three children.

Warren S. Brown, PhD is Professor of Psychology at the Graduate School of Psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary, where he is Director of the Lee Travis Research Institute. He received his PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Southern California. He is actively involved in neuropsychological research, particularly related to the consequences of agenesis of the corpus callosum for intellectual and social abilities. Among his more than 75 research publications are 15 articles on the neuropsychology of ACC. Dr. Brown also co-authored 37 presentations at scientific meetings regarding his research on ACC.

Lynn K. Paul, PhD (Past President of the NODCC) is currently serving as Senior Research Fellow at California Institute of Technology, where she is directing an ACC research program. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Fuller Graduate School of Psychology working with Dr. Warren Brown and completed a residency in clinical neuropsychology from the Department of Neurology, UCLA. Dr. Paul is a licensed clinical psychologist who conducts neuropsychological evaluations for individuals with ACC. Her research publications are primarily on the neuropsychology of ACC, particularly focused on cognition, non-literal language, and psychosocial functioning. Dr. Paul and colleagues recently published a review of ACC in Nature Reviews Neuroscience.

Lecture Abstract: Professionals conducting on-going research studies related to agenesis of the corpus callosum and other callosal disorders presented a brief overview of the current status on genetic, neuropsychological and behavior research relative to disorders of the corpus callosum. Presentation compiled by Warren S. Brown PhD, Lynn K. Paul, PhD, Elliott Sherr, MD, PhD.

Back to top

 

Early Developmental Milestones (2007)audio podcast

Speakers: Elizabeth L. (Betty) McBride, OTR has treated in pediatrics in Dallas area for over 15 years. She has been involved in one of the largest private Sensory Integration clinics since its conception in 1990. She is Sensory Integration Praxis (SIPT) certified and has been treating with craniosacral treatment since the mid 1990’s. Last year she started studying one of the latest treatments for SID (Sensory Integration Deficit) individuals, Manual Lymph Drainage. Betty is the visionary behind SI-Challenge (SI-C) and designed their camping program. Her latest interest is incorporating integrated listening therapy with treatment sessions.

Kate Lundgren, OTR, MBA has been a registered Occupational Therapist for over 19 years. She specialized in the treatment of neurological disorders and traumas for the first 10 years of her career and completed her NDT certification in 1995. Since her move to Dallas in 1997 from Southern California, Kate has focused on the treatment of pediatrics disorders, more specifically, autism, sensory integration dysfunctions and craniosacral therapy for both adults and children. Kate has served since 2000 on the Board of Directors for SI Challenge, a nonprofit organization dedicated to sensory integration dysfunction. Currently, Kate is an adjunct professor in the graduate school of Occupational Therapy at Texas Women’ University teaching courses in Pediatrics and Autism. Kate has been married for 18 years and is the mother of two boys (elementary and teen) with learning differences, “special needs” and sensory integration dysfunction. Kate will complete her SIPT (Sensory Integration Certification) in November of 2007. Kate is currently employed in a pediatric outpatient clinic, North Texas Therapy Innovations, as the clinical supervisor of the McKinney location.

Lecture Abstract: In this workshop significant developmental milestones in a child’ growth from birth through early childhood will be discussed including gross and fine motor skills and sensory integration dysfunction. Recognition of developmental delays at specific ages and recommendations for therapeutic intervention will also be discussed.

Back to top

 

Financial Planning, Trusts and Social Security (2007)

Speakers: Lindsay McGinley Vitovsky, BBA, a Texas native, is the proud sister of Anthony, who was born with agenesis of the corpus callosum. After earning her BBA from the University of North Texas, Lindsay went on to become a registered representative with the NASD. In addition to helping families and individuals with their personal financial needs, Lindsay teaches workshops specialized for women. Having grown up in a family of 21 children, twelve being physically and/or mentally challenged, Lindsay uses her personal experience when helping families with their financial plans.

Richard D. (Rick) O’Connor, Jr. JD is a partner in the firm of Blankenship, Wiland & O’Connor in Dallas, Texas. He has been practicing law in the Dallas area for twenty-eight years and specializes in the areas of estate planning and probate, with a particular emphasis in special needs planning and guardianship. Rick has been involved as a board member and officer of various organizations whose purpose is to promote the interests and welfare of people with mental disabilities. He is a former chairman and twelve-year member of the Volunteer Council of the Denton State School, a former member of the Board and Vice President of Planned Living Assistance Network of North Texas and a former member of CPAC, an advisory panel to the Commissioner of the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation. Rick speaks frequently on the subjects of special needs planning and guardianship.

Rosalie (Lee) Alviar is the Public Affairs Specialist for the Dallas/Ft Worth metroplex and a 16 year veteran within the Social Security Administration having held a variety of management positions. She was hand selected to participate in Social Security’s highly coveted Leadership Development Program, is actively involved in several community projects, a long term volunteer with the American Red Cross, and a member of the Executive Board for La Voz Del Anciano (a program for the elderly) in Dallas. Lee is the President for the Dallas/Fort Worth Charter of the Hispanic Affairs Association, an active member of the Women’s Affairs Association Council, and she achieved Toastmasters’ highest honor, the Distinguished Toastmaster award. Her keen leadership skills were recognized when the 2700 members of District 25 elected her to their highest office, District Governor. Under her leadership and guidance last year, District 25 was the number one district in the United States. She has presented and trained at numerous conferences in Texas and abroad. An accomplished speaker, Lee’s unique and amiable speaking style has captivated Toastmaster and professional audiences.

Lecture Abstract: Panel members will individually give a short presentation relative to their area of expertise, then the floor will be opened to general questions relative to financial planning, trusts, and social security benefits. Questions may include topics on government benefits, techniques to preserve government benefits eligibility for SSI and Medicaid, legal and financial issues in special needs planning and trusts, a letter of intent, guardianship of a child or adult, client self-determination issues, determination of funds needed to provide lifetime quality care.

Back to top

 

Helping a Child Socialize for Ages 5 – 13 (2007)

Speaker: Greg L. Gore, MA, LPC is a licensed professional counselor who holds a Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy and a Masters in Religious Education from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He currently maintains an active outpatient practice in North Dallas specializing in the treatment of children and adolescents dealing with mood disorder and learning differences.

Lecture Abstract: This lecture presents discussion on the role of the parent as it relates to a child’s social development. Erickson’s psychosocial stages of development from birth to young adulthood will be presented. Practical means, techniques and specific parental modeling will be included in order to teach and communicate appropriate social behaviors to the child. Also included in the format will be information as it pertains to various diagnoses, disorders and delays and how these issues impact the socialization process in the child. In addition, children and their “chemistry of emotions” will be discussed as it relates to mood concerns, which influence peer connection and social interaction. Treatment options and planning will be presented in order to assist and improve the child’s overall behavior and psychological make-up. A question and answer period will be provided at the completion of the presentation.

Back to top

 

Raising a Special Needs Child (2007)

Speaker: Martha Kate Downey holds a degree in social work and is a speaker, educator and the author of several publications including If You’ve Ever Wanted to Crawl In the Closet with an OREO, What Do I Do About Hitting?!, The People in a Girl’s Life, TAP DANCING in the Night, and Traveling Grace. She is founder and director of Come Read with Me – a program with three missions: to encourage life-long learning and thus help adults with developmental delays maintain and increase cognitive function throughout their lifetime; to collect valuable, tangible data regarding the levels of cognitive function to effect legislation for the long-term care of adults with special needs (study being designed and implemented in conjunction with Texas Tech University and Texas Women’s University) and to encourage other organizations to build educational programming into their projects and missions. But Martha notes she is mainly “just mom to Kate”, age 25 with Noonan’s Syndrome and autism.

Lecture Abstract: The world of a special needs family is often confusing, sometimes amusing, but always a challenge. The presentation will include insights and concerns the speaker has had as the mother of a child with developmental disabilities. Attendees will be offered an opportunity to hear of a journey that began with a baby and continues as the parent of a young adult with special challenges.

Back to top

 

Sexuality: Teen & Adult Issues (2007)

Speaker: Martha Kate Downey holds a degree in social work and is a speaker, educator and the author of several publications including If You’ve Ever Wanted to Crawl In the Closet with an OREO, What Do I Do About Hitting?!, The People in a Girl’s Life, TAP DANCING in the Night, and Traveling Grace. She is founder and director of Come Read with Me – a program with three missions: to encourage life-long learning and thus help adults with developmental delays maintain and increase cognitive function throughout their lifetime; to collect valuable, tangible data regarding the levels of cognitive function to effect legislation for the long-term care of adults with special needs (study being designed and implemented in conjunction with Texas Tech University and Texas Women’s University) and to encourage other organizations to build educational programming into their projects and missions. But Martha notes she is mainly “just mom to Kate,” age 25 with Noonan’s Syndrome and autism.

Lecture Abstract: Sexuality is a topic few parents feel at ease discussing or even thinking about. As the director of a school for adults with developmental disabilities, the speaker has come to know well many teens and adults with special challenges. They often share their personal thoughts, trials and fears about their lives. Abuse, sexuality, their general health and their desire to marry are topics they often consider. As the co-author of a book on relationships for those with special needs (The People in a Girl’s Life written with daughter, Kate Downey), the speaker has explored the issues of sexuality, spirituality and the general medical care for these individuals and their families. Conversations and thoughts of families who have older adults with special needs will be shared. This will be an opportunity to raise often-unspoken questions and fears about “taboo” subjects.

Back to top

 

Telling Your Child, Siblings and Classmates about DCC (2007)

Speaker: Kristen Barge, MA, LCSW attained a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology with a minor in Family Services from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a MA in Counseling Psychology from National University in San Diego, CA. She lives with her family in Madison, WI where she works part-time with the Dane County Department of Human Services specializing in work with delinquent teens and their families in Juvenile Court. Kristen and her Wisconsin planning team hosted the 2004 ACC conference in Madison, WI. A member of the NODCC Board of Directors, she has attended conferences since 2001 and has recently started to help facilitate networking sessions at the conferences by sharing her experiences as a professional and a parent of a child with complete ACC.

Lecture Abstract: This workshop will focus on the issue of Telling Your Child/Siblings/Classmates about DCC. Kristen Barge, parent of a child with complete ACC, will share her experience regarding when and how to tell your child about DCC, as well as give a demonstration of materials that may be helpful when explaining the condition. Since parents of children with special needs are the experts of their own child and because we all learn from each other, parents attending this session will be encouraged to share any techniques they use that are particularly helpful to them. The pros and cons of “telling” will be discussed with a primary emphasis on telling your child they have DCC.

Back to top

 

Behavior Modification (2006)watch nowwatch now 2

Speaker: Ronald Kotkin, PhD is currently a Clinical Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Director of the University of California at Irvine , Child Development Center (CDC) Day Treatment Program for children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. He has been a special education teacher at the elementary school level. He has published multiple articles and chapters on school-based intervention and has currently published a book for practitioners on attention and learning problems in children and adolescents. He has developed the Irvine Paraprofessional Program, which has been recognized by the Kentucky Federal Resource Center as a promising practice for intervening with students with ADHD in the regular classroom, and was awarded by CHADD for development of the most innovative program in the country for serving ADHD children in the general education classroom.

Lecture Abstract: Behavior modification offers parents and teachers a tool for motivating children to give their best effort in meeting their potential. This session demonstrates the key components of a behavior modification program. Participants will learn how to develop a comprehensive behavioral intervention; how to complete an “ABC analysis” to identify antecedents to the target behavior; consequences that may be maintaining unwanted, competing behaviors; and the power of positive reinforcement. The second portion of this presentation addresses the many challenges children with ADD, ADHD and autism have in being able to meet the academic and social expectations in the school setting. Behavior modification offers the tools necessary to plan for success. Case studies will be presented to demonstrate a range of behavioral strategies to help program for success.

Back to top

 

Development of the Corpus Callosum: Agenesis, Partial, Hypoplasia (2006)watch nowwatch now 2

Speaker: John Bodensteiner, MD is the William Pilcher Chair of Pediatric Neurology, Chief of Pediatric Neurology at Children’s Health Center & Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph ’s Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona. He is the author of more than 350 publications including papers, abstracts, chapters, reviews and commentaries. Dr. Bodensteiner holds many honors and distinguished service awards including teacher of the year in four different medical school, Who’s Who, Best Doctors in America and America’s Top Physicians. His research has also included study of the corpus callosum.

Lecture Abstract: Agenesis/partial/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum has been described in over 200 genetic disorders and is associated with other intracranial malformations. The anatomy of the corpus callosum and varied etiology and patterns of these anomalies are discussed, including major events in the embryogenesis and development of the brain, microcephaly, colpocephaly, Aicardi syndrome, Chiari II malformation and other syndromes. (Kindly note this lecture does include graphic examples of the brain malformations discussed.)

Back to top

 

Helping Children to Socialize for ages 7 to 12 (2006)watch now

Speaker: Terrie Naramor, PhD is a pediatric neuropsychologist at Loma Linda University. She is the founder of Acorn to Oak a new developmental consulting firm specializing in the assessment needs of the pediatric population.

Lecture Abstract: Foundational to helping a child become appropriately social is the relationship that parents have with their child. Relationship requires a secure base, knowledge of your child’s unique set of personal strengths and weaknesses, and consistency in routine and limit setting. Parenting your child must be thoughtful and purposeful. As the child feels secure in their relationship with parents, they are able to experiment with and participate in relationships beyond the home. One of our tasks as parents is to assist our child in the development of the skills necessary to socialize with others. This presentation will assist parents in the development of a plan to help their school-aged child more comfortably and competently socialize with others.

Back to top

 

Maximizing Your IEP (2006) – watch now

Speaker: Richard Chamovitz, Esq represents families who dispute the appropriateness of a school’s education of their children with special needs. He volunteers as a political advocate for the rights individuals with intellectual, physical and developmental disabilities and to develop programs and services to meet the needs of these individuals and their families. He is an active member of The Arc (formerly known as the Association of Retarded Citizens) at the national, state and local level, where he is President of The Arc of Chester County, PA, and chairs its Government Affairs and Advocacy Committee. Richard is also the Chairman of the Board of Directors for Hope Springs Equestrian, a non-profit corporation that promotes horse-facilitated learning, team building and therapy programs. He has presented on special education nationwide, and served as the emcee for last year’s NODCC annual conference. His wife, Maureen, and he have a nine-year-old son who receives special education in a public school.

Lecture Abstract: Research reveals that the secondary and college students who are most successful are those who have accepted their disabilities, know how to compensate for them, and have learned to identify situations in which they can prosper. This lecture will present steps on how to become your child’s best advocate in the educational system including a description of the IEP process and hints for successful planning and engagement.

Back to top

NODCC CENTRAL OFFICE

PMB 363, 18032-C Lemon Drive, Yorba Linda, CA 92886
Phone: (714) 747-0063
Fax: (714) 693-0808
Email: info@nodcc.org
Privacy policy

Corpus Callosum Disorders   |   Newly Diagnosed   |   Resources   |   Research   |   Professionals   |   Donate   |   Get Involved   |   Conferences   |   Community   |   About NODCC   |   Contact

Designed by DKH Studios and Powered by MMediaWeb®

National Organization for Disorders of the Corpus Callosum   |   Copyright 2014   |   All Rights Reserved